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Allan Douglas Kirk, MD, PhD

David C. Sabiston, Jr. Distinguished Professor of Surgery
Chair, Department of Surgery
Professor of Surgery
Professor in Pediatrics
Professor in the Department of Immunology
Campus Mail: DUMC 3704, Durham, NC 27710

I am a surgeon with interest in immune management of transplant recipients. I am particularly interested in therapies that influence T cell costimulation pathways and adjuvant therapies that facilitate costimulation blockade to prevent the rejection of transplanted organs without undue suppression of protective immunity. I am also interested in understanding how injury, such as that occurring during trauma or in elective surgery, influences immune responses and subsequent healing following injury.

Costimulation Blockade in Organ Transplantion

Allan D. Kirk, MD, PhD, Department of Surgery Chairman
David C. Sabiston, Jr. Professor of Surgery

Education and Training

  • Fellow, Multi Organ Transplantation, University of Wisconsin, Madison, 1995 - 1997
  • Chief Resident, Surgery, Duke University, 1994 - 1995
  • Senior Resident, Surgery, Duke University, 1992 - 1994
  • Research Fellow, Surgery, Duke University, 1989 - 1992
  • Intern & Junior Resident, Surgery, Duke University, 1987 - 1989
  • Ph.D., Duke University, 1992
  • M.D., Duke University School of Medicine, 1987
  • B.S., Old Dominion University, 1983

Selected Grants

Publications

Hoffmann, S. C., J. P. Pearl, D. A. Hale, R. B. Mannon, S. J. Swanson, and A. D. Kirk. “Early allograft rejection is mediated by CD3+CD4+CD45RA-CD62L-memory cells following alemtuzumab depletion.” In American Journal of Transplantation, 4:413–413. BLACKWELL MUNKSGAARD, 2004.

Scholars@Duke

Xu, H., X. J. Zhang, F. Leopradi, R. B. Mannon, and A. D. Kirk. “Human platelet-derived CD154 plays an important role in initiating allograft rejetion.” In American Journal of Transplantation, 4:581–581. BLACKWELL MUNKSGAARD, 2004.

Scholars@Duke

Pearl, J. P., J. Parris, K. L. McCoy, S. C. Hoffman, K. L. Christopher, H. Xu, R. B. Mannon, D. Hale, S. J. Swanson, and A. D. Kirk. “Immunocompetent memory T-cells are the dominant cell type following antibody-mediated T-cell depletion and may be a barrier to achieving tolerance.” In American Journal of Transplantation, 4:303–303. BLACKWELL MUNKSGAARD, 2004.

Scholars@Duke

Xu, H., K. K. Dhanireddy, and A. D. Kirk. “Monocytes act as a bridge between T cells and allogeneic endothelial cells via IFN gamma-dependent processes.” In American Journal of Transplantation, 4:538–538. BLACKWELL MUNKSGAARD, 2004.

Scholars@Duke

Xu, H., X. J. Zhang, and A. D. Kirk. “Monocytes engulf endothelial membranes via a scavenger receptor, and scavenger receptor blockade prevents monocyte activation.” In American Journal of Transplantation, 4:393–393. BLACKWELL MUNKSGAARD, 2004.

Scholars@Duke

Mannon, R. B., O. H. Cheng, S. C. Hoffmann, A. D. Kirk, and G. Grottendorst. “Predicting the future: Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), a surrogate for the development of chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN) in man.” In American Journal of Transplantation, 4:276–276. BLACKWELL MUNKSGAARD, 2004.

Scholars@Duke

Elster, E. A., C. Chamberlain, C. Salaita, A. D. Kirk, D. Hale, and R. B. Mannon. “Steroids have no calories: Weight gain post transplantation is not prevented by steroid avoidance.” In American Journal of Transplantation, 4:545–545. BLACKWELL MUNKSGAARD, 2004.

Scholars@Duke

Hoffmann, S. C., R. L. Kampen, J. P. Pearl, D. A. Hale, L. M. Jacobson, D. E. Kleiner, R. B. Mannon, et al. “The new standard of care: Alemtuzumab induction with Tacrolimus and Sirolimus maintenance immunosuppression to limit acute and chronic allograft rejection.” In American Journal of Transplantation, 4:332–332. BLACKWELL MUNKSGAARD, 2004.

Scholars@Duke

Chamberlain, C. E., E. Elster, D. Hale, A. D. Kirk, C. E. Daniels, and R. B. Mannon. “Weaker and weaker still: Steroid avoidance does not prevent bone loss following kidney transplantation.” In American Journal of Transplantation, 4:566–566. BLACKWELL MUNKSGAARD, 2004.

Scholars@Duke

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