Skip to main content

Monty Hughes Jr., PhD

Director, Duke University Urinary Dysfunction Laboratory
Assistant Professor in Surgery
Office: 383 MSRB 1, Durham, NC 27710
Campus Mail: DUMC 383 MSRB 1, Durham, NC 27710

 Dr. Hughes received his Ph.D. from the Medical University of South Carolina and was a post doc at both the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and NIH. He then joined the faculty of the University of North Carolina at Charlotte where he rose to the rank of Associate Professor (with tenure). Following a brief stint as the director of the biology division of a start-up pharmaceutical company, he joined forces with Dr. Purves at the Medical University of South Carolina to begin this lab focused on benign urinary disorders. Dr. Hughes has been at Duke since 2015. He is currently an Assistant Professor working within the Department of Surgery and Division of Urology. He serves as the Director of the Urinary Dysfunction Laboratory which studies the role of inflammation in disorders such as bladder outlet obstruction and diabetic bladder dysfunction. In association with Dr. J Todd Purves, this lab has been instrumental in demonstrating the central importance of the NLRP3 inflammasome in sensing the biochemical stressors associated with these disorders and translating them into an inflammatory signal. This signal is ultimately responsible for changes in voiding function, denervation and fibrosis.

Education and Training

  • Senior Research Scientist, Surgery / Urology, Duke University School of Medicine, 2015 - 2019
  • Ph.D., Medical University of South Carolina, 1992
  • B.S., Clemson University, 1987

Publications

Trbovich, A. M., F. M. Hughes, G. I. Perez, K. Kugu, K. I. Tilly, J. A. Cidlowski, and J. L. Tilly. “High and low molecular weight DNA cleavage in ovarian granulosa cells: characterization and protease modulation in intact cells and in cell-free nuclear autodigestion assays.” Cell Death Differ 5, no. 1 (January 1998): 38–49. https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.cdd.4400299.

Full Text

Hughes, F. M., C. D. Bortner, G. D. Purdy, and J. A. Cidlowski. “Intracellular K+ suppresses the activation of apoptosis in lymphocytes.” J Biol Chem 272, no. 48 (November 28, 1997): 30567–76. https://doi.org/10.1074/jbc.272.48.30567.

Full Text

Huang, S. T. J., F. M. Hughes, and J. A. Cidlowski. “Candidate nucleases responsible for genomic degradation during apoptosis.” Comments on Toxicology 5, no. 6 (June 30, 1997): 555–69.

Scholars@Duke

Bian, X., F. M. Hughes, Y. Huang, J. A. Cidlowski, and J. W. Putney. “Roles of cytoplasmic Ca2+ and intracellular Ca2+ stores in induction and suppression of apoptosis in S49 cells.” Am J Physiol 272, no. 4 Pt 1 (April 1997): C1241–49. https://doi.org/10.1152/ajpcell.1997.272.4.C1241.

Full Text

Hughes, F. M., and J. A. Cidlowski. “Utilization of an in vitro assay to evaluate chromatin degradation by candidate apoptotic nucleases.” Cell Death Differ 4, no. 3 (April 1997): 200–208. https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.cdd.4400221.

Full Text

Montague, J. W., F. M. Hughes, and J. A. Cidlowski. “Native recombinant cyclophilins A, B, and C degrade DNA independently of peptidylprolyl cis-trans-isomerase activity. Potential roles of cyclophilins in apoptosis.” J Biol Chem 272, no. 10 (March 7, 1997): 6677–84. https://doi.org/10.1074/jbc.272.10.6677.

Full Text

Hughes, F. M., G. D. Purdy, and J. A. Cidlowski. “Intracellular potassium levels inhibit apoptotic dna degradation.” Faseb Journal 10, no. 6 (December 1, 1996).

Scholars@Duke

Tilly, J. L., J. A. Flaws, A. M. DeSanti, F. M. Hughes, K. I. Tilly, D. V. Maravei, A. M. Trbovich, J. A. Cidlowski, and A. N. Hirshfield. “Biochemical and morphological investigation of apoptosis and atresia in rat ovarian antral follicles incubated in vitro.” In Biology of Reproduction, 54:124–124. SOC STUDY REPRODUCTION, 1996.

Scholars@Duke

Cidlowski, J. A., K. L. King, R. B. Evans-Storms, J. W. Montague, C. D. Bortner, and F. M. Hughes. “The biochemistry and molecular biology of glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis in the immune system.” Recent Prog Horm Res 51 (1996): 457–90.

Scholars@Duke

Pages